Teaching Reflection: Know My Name

“I will give you three days,” said he, “and if by that time you know what my name is, you shall keep your child.” Like the Brothers Grimm tale of Rumpelstiltskin, names have power – especially if their utterance causes you to sink into the earth and to split yourself down the middle into two….

Teaching Reflection: Presentation Slides

I listen to a lot of podcasts. A number of them relate to teaching and research practices, previously I have kept a notebook of reflections. I thought it would be interesting to share my thoughts about certain episodes and how I will implement ideas into practice, but also consider my own institution’s advice, and provide…

Once more unto the breach…

I started blogging when I left Australia at the end of 2017 and I genuinely found the process to be enjoyable. The process of writing and sharing my travels and thoughts, it was an outlet for creativity. At the end of 2018 I was contacted by a man who felt entitled to enter my creative…

Do pass go and collect £200. Board games to teach university students

Blog piece released today with Northampton University News. Schools regularly use board games as an effective means to teach principles and values to children. But can the same approach work in higher education? Our ‘eye on crime’, Lecturer in Criminology Jessica Ritchie writes about how she and Associate Lecturer Bethany Davies rolled the dice at…

London’s electronic tagging pilot – will it work?

A blog post I wrote earlier this month for The University of Northampton News. The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan announced that the capital is trialing the use of electronic tagging with offenders on release in the community for knife-related crimes. Our ‘eye on crime’, Jessica Ritchie, Lecturer in Criminology, blogs about the effectiveness of…

Seek and you shall find – crime prediction software

A blog post I wrote earlier this month for The University of Northampton News. The BBC recently reported that 14 police forces in England use a piece of software that is being used to identify and ‘track’ perceived criminals, with a view to reducing the likelihood of them committing crime. Our ‘eye on crime’ Jessica…

From Queensland to England, new Criminology lecturer talks about her interests

Last week the University of Northampton posted a blog piece on my new position. The newest member of the University’s Criminology team is bringing an international perspective for students, following research in her native Australia. Jessica Ritchie, Lecturer in Criminology, gained her undergraduate degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice in 2011. She gained subsequent qualifications…

October Book Reads

A little late, but these are the books I read in October, a mixture of crime and feminism. Dear Ijeawele: A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Murder on the Orient Express, Agatha Christie Bitch Doctrine: Essays for Dissenting Adults, Laurie Penny Forensics: The Anatomy of Crime, Val McDermid Life After Death, Damien…

Productive Procrastination

A post written last month for Thoughts from the Criminology Team on Productive Procrastination. There’s the saying ‘Find your passion and you’ll never work a day in your life,’ however I much prefer the updated version ‘Find your passion and you’ll work every day of your life’ BUT you’ll love it. Criminology and the law…